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Covering the villages of Wilsden and Harecroft
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  7th March – On the night of the 7th March, a 1-ton bomb was dropped from a German Bomber on Warrington Crescent, Maida Vale, London, killing 12 people. It was also the most materially destructive single bomb dropped on Britain during the whole war, destroying six houses and heavily damaging dozens more.

9th March – A series of huge German artillery barrages and gas attacks on the Western Front signalled the opening phase of what would be their largest           gamble of the entire war – a huge assault on the British and French defences. Until this point in the war, the major set-piece assaults on the Western Front (such as the Somme, Passchendaele, and at Cambrai) had all been initiated by the Allies, and they had all broken on the superior German defence lines. It was now the Germans who would try to break through the lines of trenches, their overwhelming concern to secure victory before American forces reached the war zones. The main attack would begin on the 21st March.



WILSDEN

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Sources

Keighley News Archive (accessed via Bradford Libraries website)

Gilbert, M. First World War

http://www.ww1playingthegame.org.uk/





A Wilsden Military Tribunal

At a meeting of the West Riding Appeals Tribunal, held at Bradford on Wednesday, a firm of manufacturers appealed against the decision of the Wilsden Tribunal in respect of the exemption of a weaving overlooker, aged 27 years. The employers said that this was the only man who understood Jacquard and drop-box looms. His wages were 78s a week. In answer to the military representative, the employer said that he had tried his best to get another overlooker by advertising, but had failed. The secretary of the Overlookers’ Society said that the men in the trade were organised up to 100 per cent. He knew where every overlooker was in Bradford and district, and he could truly say there was not a single man available. Temporary exemption was granted to May 1.

- Keighley News, 2nd March 1918

3rd March – At 5 in the afternoon, the Russo-German peace treaty was signed at Brest-Litovsk. The Bolsheviks had accepted the harsh realities, and had ceded all claims to the Baltic provinces, Poland, White Russia (modern Belarus), Finland, Bessarabia, the Ukraine and the Caucasus. This comprised a third of Russia’s pre-war population, a third of her arable land, and nine-tenths of her coalfields – this was almost all the territory that had been added to Russia since the reign of Peter the Great more than two hundred years before. The Russians had also lost all their naval bases on the Black Sea except for Kronstadt; All their Black Sea fleet warships were to be disarmed and detained. 630,000 Austrian prisoners of war were to be immediately released. Finally, all the Armenian territory captured by the Russians since 1916 was to be transferred to Turkish control – Armenian soldiers fought against this decision but were crushed by Turkish troops sweeping eastwards.

Sources

Keighley News Archive (accessed via Bradford Libraries website)

Gilbert, M. First World War

 

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Sources

Keighley News Archive (accessed via Bradford Libraries website)